Why “pre-translating” is a waste of time and money

google-translate-transcreation-pre-translation

Photo by Amador Loureiro via unsplash.com

Translation: Don’t try this at home

At a previous job, I occasionally received documents or presentations already translated into English by a non-native speaker. Every time, the customer would say something like: “It just needs a quick review by a native speaker.”

What is the result 90% of the time?

A lot of time wasted and a bigger bill than a comparable translation job.

Here’s why:

Translators can translate much faster than they can decipher imperfect English or, worse, machine-transmangled English.

And all that back-and-forth

In addition to the time required for puzzling over awkward sentences, the job will also require extra administrative efforts.

Perhaps several times, the translator will have to ask a colleague or two (if available) for help in deciphering a strange sentence. And in some cases, the translator will have to ask the project manager to ask the client for help, who may also have to ask someone else internally.

In the end, it may be necessary to give up and ask the client if they have the document in the original language, simply because translation is so much quicker and easier – for professionals, that is.

Personally, I feel I would need more time to decipher a strange English sentence than I would need to translate even a difficult term like “Rote Hand Brief” (which, at the moment, you cannot find a correct translation for on popular sites like linguee.de, leo.org or dict.cc).

If I were editing a pre-translated document about a “red hand letter”, I’d probably never be able to correct it. (In case you’re curious, a “Rote Hand Brief” is a Dear Doctor Letter / Dear Healthcare Provider Letter.)

A heart for learners

Although these kinds of jobs can be stressful, I’m definitely a bleeding heart for learners of English. If you want to practice your language skills by preparing English documents on your own, then by all means do so. I used to be an English teacher and, as a learner of German and Italian, I feel your pain.

Nevertheless, be prepared for a bill that’s a little bigger the first few times you send out a document in English for correction.

Please note:

At steelecht, we don’t do many technical translations as in the example above, which comes from my previous work experience. steelecht is more focused on marketing/PR, content marketing and transcreation (market-sensitive/creative translations).

Need help with a text, content marketing scheme or getting a translation that hits the mark? Get in touch: info@steelecht.com

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